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Site Models in Archicad

In the video below I look at a number of site models I’ve built over the past few years and discuss a variety of techniques. After watching the video, if you want to experiment with some of these methods, I highly recommend you download the Shoegnome Open Template as pretty much everything I share started off as a Favorite from the template. If you see me press some buttons on the keyboard and are annoyed that you don’t have that shortcut or you are wondering where the button/toolbar I use is, download my Work Environment.

To help you build even better sites in Archicad, check out these older posts:

Archicad Site Models: Images on Meshes

An Introduction to Modeling Rocks and Boulders in Archicad

Adding Contours to a Mesh in Archicad (I actually cover this in the video above)



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If you aren’t using the current version of Archicad, you can download older versions of my template. If you use my template, I highly recommend you use my Work Environment as well. The two work together well and the Work Environment is designed to reinforce the best practices of the template. You can download my Work Environment here.

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Comments

  • October 17, 2021
    reply

    Eric Bobrow

    Jared – What a lovely potpourri of tips and tricks.
    You opened my eyes to some very creative and useful applications of Archicad’s tools.
    I love the little side comments from your daughter!
    – Eric Bobrow

  • October 17, 2021
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    Dominicus Björkstam

    Thanks Jared,
    A lot of tips useful for a seasoned ArchiCad user as myself, as everyone tends to use AC in different ways and workflows. It’s always fun to watch another archicad user make use of the tools in dofferent ways 🙂

    Take care and greetings from Finland,

    Dominicus

  • October 17, 2021
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    Dominicus Björkstam

    ….and to add; the terrain and road intersection method of visualizing roads and pathways is superb as you can make changes along the way and don’t have to redo the whole road every time. I used to do it by using slabs and boolean operations to first cut away the underside of the slab against the mesh and then convert it to a morph. Then lowering the morph by a friction and boolean it against the mesh and using the morphs material on the mesh to get all the roads visible with a different material and a bit lower than the rest.
    Your method is sooo much better at least when doing studies in the beginning.

    Thanks/ Dominicus

  • October 18, 2021
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    Billy Earnest #bearnest

    Good stuff! I live & work in mountain geography, so my site modeling has required “creative modeling solutions” from day 1. Thanks for sharing your site modeling tricks!

  • October 18, 2021
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    Mark Renz

    Excellent video Jared! Incredibly informative and thanks for sharing!

    Do you use the 3d terrain in your sections? Or do you use a graphic fill? I ask because I run into issues modeling the terrain and then doing SEOs when I want to clean up conflicts with the new foundation walls, slab, etc. The issues really arise out of which renovation filter layer you have it on. When I show a 3d view of the exiting it then has the SEOs for the new.

    Sometimes I create another terrain copy that is on the existing Reno filter. But, it seems odd to create both. However, I can’t find a great workaround. Sometimes, I find myself using combination of 3d modeling and fills in my sections. It’s a bit clunky and I’m curious if you found a cleaner way.

  • October 18, 2021
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    Mark Renz

    Oh…and awesome video editing! 🙂

  • October 29, 2021
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    Darren Bell

    Great tips, I use many similar techniques picked up over the years.
    Wow, that’s my boulder wall object, now in the USA, amazing, didn’t even know I had donated it to the wider community.

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