Shoegnome http://www.shoegnome.com Being an Architect in the 21st Century Ain't Easy Thu, 28 May 2015 17:30:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Roommate Test of Manhood http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/28/roommate-test-of-manhood/ http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/28/roommate-test-of-manhood/#comments Thu, 28 May 2015 17:23:48 +0000 http://www.shoegnome.com/?p=1586 Two projects from my time at school show how a strict adherence to digital or analog tools can lead to trouble. I learned a lesson and went with the tool that failed.

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There are two projects from my time at Rice University that perfectly illustrate the modern plight of the architect. One, a windfarm visitors center located in Marfa, Texas was my most clunky and disappointing project in school. When I reached the point where I had enough to show in my portfolio, it was the first of my work to get axed (along with all the garbage from Freshman year). The other project, a gymnasium and dance studio in the 12th arrondissement in Paris, was one of my favorites. At least one image from that project has already made it into a blog post. For both these projects, a single decision I made at the beginning of the semester decided my subsequent success or failure.

windfarmDuring school I could see a shift happening. At the Rice University School of Architecture we didn’t officially use computers until our Junior year. Many of us taught ourselves AutoCAD the second half of Sophomore year to help us get summer internships, but Freshman and Sophomore year were all about hand drafting and model building. I’m not even sure I stepped into the computer lab until I’d been at school three semesters. By the time I started my final year of the BArch, the irreversible seachange occurred. Freshmen were in the computer lab using Maya and Photoshop. It still wasn’t sanctioned by the school (that would come a few years later), but the digital revolution was unstoppable. Computers were seeping into every aspect of our education. In 1999, we clipped magazines and glued things onto boards.  By the time I left school in 2005, everything was grabbed from the Internet, arranged in Illustrator, and printed on 11 x 17.

At the end of my Junior year, I made a conscious effort to design the windfarm project using only the computer. The huge wave of new students with amazing computer skills was still a year or two away, but things were already changing. In an effort to get better at AutoCAD (to help me get an even better summer job), I went all in. I recall barely putting a pen or pencil to a notebook. Everything was digital. Almost. I did build three basswood models, but those were all presentation models done at points where the design paused. I was probably using AutoCAD 2000 or 2002 and nothing else. It was a disaster. The project had no soul. I was overly rigid. The design was sterile.

The windfarm was also my first studio project where we had to add “green” elements, which I know also contributed to its downfall. I was heavy-handed and adhered too closely to the “optimal” solution based on whatever I was reading and researching at the time. Applying strict formulas to a project is never a good idea. Perhaps it was the combination of sustainability and computers, or maybe it was just the computers. Either way, while I got a good grade, that project left me cold. My first venture into designing without hand sketching was ugly, and enough to convince most people that designing without a pencil just doesn’t work.

My best friend (and current architecture partner over at Grayform Architecture) David Jefferis and I spent our penultimate semester of college at the Rice School of Architecture Paris. We had been roommates for two years and often challenged each other to Roommate Tests of Manhood. We were architecture students with hobbies like cooking, playing guitar, and discussing video games so these feats of strength typically included such struggles as opening a jar of pickles in front of a girlfriend, driving six hours to New Orleans without stopping to pee, charretting without coffee, cooking meat, etc. Paris provided our greatest and final Roommate Test of Manhood (I got married after our Senior year; so with my wife back in Houston, this was our last time to be irresponsible roommates). While every other student would be bringing a computer with them to carry on the standard practice of an upper level architecture student, we made a pact: computers were for e-mail and other such non-studio activities. We would do our individual projects like our proverbial architectural forefathers. No AutoCAD, no 3D Viz, no Illustrator CS or Photoshop 7.0. Everything by hand. It was a luxury and an anomaly. And my project kicked ass.

Something is wrong here, right? I failed to design with only the computer and crushed it using ONLY sketching. Yet now I get angry when I hear endlessly about how architects need to sketch to design, that there are no good designers that don’t sketch, that the pencil is our god. What’s going on?PARIS PROJECT - AXON

Intention, Experimentation, and a focus on Process

I didn’t have fun doing the windfarm. I was rigid and unintentional in the use of my chosen media. I didn’t explore or experiment or take advantage of the power of the tool I was using. I wasn’t consciously focusing on how I was designing. I was just doing stuff. It was kind of crap.

In Paris I was very cognizant of what was going on. I knew I was handicapped by my chosen media. In the year between the windfarm and the paris project I became much more fluent in the computer. I built tons of study models and doodled things by hand, but I no longer did much presentation work that wasn’t digital. There was no need to. Computers were fast and I knew Illustrator—oh the amazing things students can do with Adobe Illustrator! Being in Paris I knew I was using a skill that was already atrophying. And more importantly I knew I was going to be up against students who didn’t have this weird self-imposed restriction against computers. My solution was to look back at what I was really good at. Or at least really enjoyed. To a style I had developed but long laid dormant. I drew cartoons. Literally, one of my presentation drawings was a comic strip. How cool is that? Everything was loose and playful. The final building was good, but the documentation and expression of the project was great.

PARIS PROJECT - ENTRY CARTOONThis idea was aided by another decision I made: to work as much as possible outside of studio. I figured, if I was going to be in Paris for four months, I was not going to waste my time indoors. So I sat and designed in my sketchbook along the banks of the Seine, in the Bois de Vincennes (my favorite), and anywhere else I could go. Often I just walked around the Pere-Lachaise cemetery and pretended to work. Oh and I designed while sitting at the site. Of course.

What I learned wasn’t the supremacy of one tool over another, but of the greater process. My process in Paris was so much better and much more intentional. And if you look at the 2D documentation, it’s hard to argue that the second process didn’t win out.

But if you look closer at the design of the Paris project there’s something amiss. If you take away all my cartoons and cool diagrams, if you were to just build the building or show technical drawings, much of the life of the project would vanish. Oh I did some cool things with progression, views into, out of, and across the building, and I developed different types of spaces, but the greatest parts of the building weren’t the building. They were the representation of the building and the representation of the ideas of the building. And to me, looking back from 2015, this is a failure. For all the lameness of my windfarm, the dullness of design, documentation, and theoretical built project were equal. In fact, I bet the actual building would probably be better than how it looked on the screen. But the reverse is definitely true of the Paris project. The images I created were sexy, playful, and enticing. The building—while a design I still like—failed to translate that love.

PARIS PROJECT modelNow this story could also be told via the projects that came between the windfarm and the gymnasium, or my last project in school after Paris. The three that came between learned from the mess of the windfarm. I did more by hand, and also got better at thinking within the computer (this post has images of one of those projects). The last project though was the most important one. I returned to the computer after Paris, but with a better understanding of myself as a designer. I figured out ways to merge the joy and freedom of Paris with the power of Illustrator, Photoshop, and AutoCAD. And I made sure that that joy continued into the actual design of the project. What resulted was—while my worst studio grade since Freshman year for other reasons—one of my favorite projects. It was weird, like me. It was adventurous, like the drawings. It was partially designed with cartoons, and those cartoons informed how the design could survived the transition into the computer and physical model form.

It is not the tool, but the intention.

We continue to give agency to one, but not the other.

This is foolish.

For more guru-like insight from my days at school, read this post about why no one gives a shit about you. Subscribe to my blog to read more about the tricky world of being an Architect in the 21st century: Shoegnome on FacebookTwitter, and the RSS feed. I wish I had more images of these projects to share, but prior to September 5th, 2006 I didn’t take data safety seriously.

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Live Online Webinar: Introducing ARCHICAD 19 – Faster than Ever! http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/26/live-online-webinar-introducing-archicad-19-faster-than-ever/ http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/26/live-online-webinar-introducing-archicad-19-faster-than-ever/#comments Tue, 26 May 2015 17:24:01 +0000 http://www.shoegnome.com/?p=2670 ARCHICAD 19 is now faster than ever! Learn more during this live online webinar.

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ARCHICAD 19 webinarWHO:

GRAPHISOFT, the leading Building Information Modeling (BIM) software vendor

WHAT:

A live online webinar on June 1 featuring GRAPHISOFT’s ARCHICAD 19. ARCHICAD 19 is now faster than ever! No more waiting for views to load. Because GRAPHISOFT has extended its robust 64-bit and multi-processing technologies with background processing—an industry first for BIM. So ARCHICAD now offers lightning-fast response times. And this turbo-charged update to ARCHICAD makes it the undisputed speed leader in the BIM business.

In this webinar, we will present Bradford College, designed by Bond Bryan Architects. Bradford College is one of Britain’s largest further education colleges, located in Bradford in West Yorkshire, with approximately 25,000 students. Bond Bryan Architects are a UK-based design firm of 90 professionals, with studios in London, Sheffield and Kent, plus representatives across the globe. Bond Bryan used ARCHICAD and benefited from the OPEN BIM workflow throughout the various design and construction stages.

Join us on June 1 to learn more about:

  • ARCHICAD 19’s new predictive background processing technology that generates nearly instant model views;
  • Point Cloud support that provides faster, error-free building surveys by using the latest 3D scanner laser-survey technology;
  • Improved Mac and Windows experience;
  • Intuitive workflow enhancements: Permanent Guide Lines, Listing and Annotation enhancements, PDF Improvements;
  • OPEN BIM enhancements – improved interoperability and collision detection.

WHEN: Monday, June 1, 2015

Register here!

Please register for any of the dates/times below to join the free, online seminar!

For Australia and Asia (English):
Mon, Jun 1, 2015; 4:00 PM EST (Sydney Time):
register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/200000000025535212

For Europe, Middle-East and Africa (English):
Mon, Jun 1, 2015 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM GMT (London Time)
register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8014260356775167489

For the Americas (English):
Mon, Jun 1, 2015 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PDT (Pacific Time, Los Angeles)
register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5656130072102614273

About GRAPHISOFT

GRAPHISOFT® ignited the BIM revolution in 1984 with ARCHICAD®, the industry first BIM software for architects. GRAPHISOFT continues to lead the industry with innovative solutions such as its revolutionary BIMcloud® the world’s first real-time BIM collaboration environment, EcoDesigner™, the world’s first fully BIM-integrated “GREEN” design solution and BIMx®, the world’s leading mobile app for BIM visualization. GRAPHISOFT has been a part of the Nemetschek Group since its acquisition in 2007.

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Colloquial BIM http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/15/colloquial-bim/ http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/15/colloquial-bim/#comments Fri, 15 May 2015 19:37:40 +0000 http://www.shoegnome.com/?p=2432 When talking about BIM, we often use language that confuses rather than clarifies. Do you know when you are speaking Proprietary or Colloquial BIM?

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Back in December 2014, I wrote a blog post on Speaking ARCHICAD, Speaking BIM and Miscommunication and there were some additional thoughts that didn’t quite fit in the original article. So in lieu of writing an article comparing Revit 2016 vs ARCHICAD 19 (I think we might be done with that sort of talk), here’s some thoughts on why direct comparisons often fall flat.

Proprietary and Colloquial BIM

Some proprietary terms become so over used that they become generic. Kleenex is a great example. In the USA that word is the generic catch all for facial tissue. Kleenex has become a generic trademark and you’ll get weird looks if you ask for a facial tissue. Everyone asks for a Kleenex (or maybe a tissue), but everybody knows that you don’t care whether it’s actually a Kleenex or some store brand tissue.

Some proprietary terms become just regular words without any connection maintained to the original. If you know the word moxie, it’s probably in reference to someone who has courage and energy. But odds are you don’t know that moxie comes from the name brand of a soda, Moxie, that’s been sold since 1884. If someone from New England (like me) says someone has Moxie, they might actually mean that person literally has some kick ass soda that some people love (like me), others find disgusting (like my wife), and most people have never heard of.

Some proprietary terms are colloquially generic. I spent a number of years in the southern part of the USA. In many places down south if you ask for a coke at a restaurant, the waiter or waitress will then ask you what kind, and you might say “Pepsi, Coke, Fanta, Sprite, Surge, Moxie, etc.” To most of us Coke is a word we say to mean Coca Cola, but for some regions of the USA it is just a term for any soda.

Coke vs not cokeThe next time you are having a conversation about BIM, ARCHICAD, or really anything related to architecture, think about the words you are using. Are you using proprietary terms, colloquial terms, or clear language that everyone understands? And if you are using special words, is that making it harder for your collaborators, friends, and colleagues to do their jobs?

Not an opening to start an argument

There was a discussion a while back on LinkedIn where someone commented that it’d be great to see a giant list which showed the analogous terminology between ARCHICAD and Revit. A light hearted response went something like this:

That list would be super short! It’d just be:
Command in ARCHICAD = Revit can’t do that
Command in ARCHICAD = Revit can’t do that
Command in ARCHICAD = Revit can’t do that

Okay so we all know that’s not true. And I’m sure the Revit crowd could just swap program names and make the same joke. For fairness, here you go:

That list would be super short! It’d just be:
Command in Revit = ARCHICAD can’t do that
Command in Revit = ARCHICAD can’t do that
Command in Revit = ARCHICAD can’t do that

But there is a grain of truth to the joke because while those programs have similar goals, they achieve them in different ways. And as we all know treating ARCHICAD like Revit or vice versa is a recipe for disaster. One reason is because there are often no directly translatable tools and terms. Sure there are some that are probably so close that they are the same, but it’s not 100%. A list of command/tool equivalents would probably confuse as much as clarify. It would be full of so many caveats.

When talking BIM, it’s important to remember to focus on common terms and language, and understand that the peculiarities of program A don’t necessary matter to program B. And that those things might not actually be BIM, just some things users of that program have to deal with, for ill or good. The Object vs Family comparison is probably the most prominent and best example of two aspects of these programs that are almost the same but probably not at all. For that discussion, check out these two awesome guest posts from a while back:

If you enjoyed this article, make sure to read the original as well: Speaking ARCHICAD, Speaking BIM and Miscommunication.

If you are interested in all the ways that people use different terms but (generally) mean the same thing, there’s no better place to go than the NC State Dialect Survey Maps.

Whether we are talking about BIM, ARCHICAD, Revit, or who gets to use the term architect, I think the words we use matter. Subscribe to my blog to read more about the tricky world of being an Architect in the 21st century: Shoegnome on FacebookTwitter, and the RSS feed.

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My house is full of wires I don’t need http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/13/my-house-is-full-of-wires-i-dont-need/ http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/13/my-house-is-full-of-wires-i-dont-need/#comments Thu, 14 May 2015 03:34:52 +0000 http://www.shoegnome.com/?p=2515 When a previous owner remodeled my house in the late 1990s and early 2000s, he probably thought he was creating a futuristic, high end palace.

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When a previous owner remodeled my house in the late 1990s and early 2000s, he probably thought he was creating a futuristic, high end palace for him and his wife. Things didn’t turn out so well. I do have the nicest kitchen in my zip code (probably) but my house is only futuristic in the 1960s WORLD OF TOMORROW sense (ie, it’s not) and I’m pretty sure the remodel led to divorce. How to make sure a remodel strengthens your marriage is a topic for another day. So let’s talk about futuristic houses instead.

My house is filled with thousands and thousands of dollars worth of wires. Wires I do not need. Wires that have just been gathering dust for years. My house was built in 1939 and then heavily remodeled from about 1999 to 2004. Yes, that’s a long remodel. The previous owner went overboard. He wisely removed all the old knob and tube wiring, but didn’t just replace it one for one with new copper wiring. He wired the house for sound, security, data, phone, and more. He was an electrical contractor and did all the work himself. He spared no expense. Having spent the 1990s wiring up homes for the original Seattle tech elite, he did the same ultra-level of detail to his own house. The quantity and quality is unreal. He was a superb craftsman. Every time I have some contractor, technician, or other person in the building industry over to my house, there is inevitably a tour followed by comments like “I need to show the guys back in the office this” and “what?!” and “there’s a lot of money here” and “the only other time I’ve seen anything like this is at this survivalist compound built by a former CEO of <big tech company>”. I’m not joking or exaggerating. Before I insulated my attic I would take people up there to show off the insanity of it. Not one of the wires in the image below is currently in use. And this is but one small corner of my attic (pre-insulation).

I do not need any of these wiresThe most recent example of discovering another layer of overbuilding happened this week when a worker from a local internet provider came to my house to connect up the new fiber optic cable they’d just installed along my street. The technician became perplexed when looking at my phone line, which is of course buried in the ground and thus comes out of a hole in my basement wall. My main phone line, unlike yours, is about 3/4″ thick and is wired to support about twenty-five phone lines. The tech said that the phone company doesn’t do this sort of thing. It must have been a special job. He only ever sees wiring like this to commercial buildings.

The technician left my house without connecting me to the fiber optic cable because the giant phone wire went nowhere—the phone box it should be connected to was missing—and more importantly because all that money sunk into a big fat coil of copper wires wasn’t good enough to handle the blazing speed of the fiber optic cable. My overbuilt phone line, which probably hadn’t been connected to a land line in umpteen years, was outdated and worthless. In a few weeks, the tech will return, run a new fiber optic cable through the buried conduit, and connect me to the modern world. The only thing the existing wires are good for are acting as a lead to pull a string through the conduit—a string that will then be used to pull the new wires through. What a waste.

This story is typical of my house. So many of the wires are part of unfinished or completely outdated systems. The house is wired for security, but the system was never installed. Any new security system would be completely wireless. The house has a home audio system, with fat speaker wires running through the walls and ceilings, and paired speakers in most rooms. The basement portion was never completed: the wires just dead end into an electrical box you’d find in the back room of a Chipotle. The upstairs wires all come to an empty alcove in the kitchen where a sound system should be. Speakers however are but one part of a sound system. When we bought the house, I thought, hey, whole-house audio! I daydreamed a little bit about having Pantera blasting through the house while I worked, or perhaps some Taylor Swift dance parties with my daughters. Then I researched getting the sound system up and running. I’d need thousands of dollars of equipment: amps, sources, switches, etc. Again, this was a high end system, so buying a used two-channel stereo won’t cut it. All that on top of testing to make sure the speakers still work and provide decent sound. I did the math. It’d be cheaper to buy an iPad for each room in my house, just for music. But of course I don’t even need that because wireless speakers exist. And I can just connect those speakers to the iPad I already own. Or to be honest, the iPad has pretty good speakers already, so I don’t even need to bother. I can just carry the iPad from room to room. Which I’m probably doing anyways for one reason or another.

So UselessAll these systems and wires were installed around 1999. Between then and July 2014 when my wife and I bought the house, there were two other home owners who just let those wires take up space. The speaker cables sat in a big coil in the kitchen. The attic was littered with wires. Downstairs speaker cables, Cat-5, and a host of other low voltage wiring ended in two giant electrical boxes that transformed one room from a potential office or play space into a sharp edged, vaguely dangerous utility room. Even though the previous owners weren’t using the phones, security system, or speakers, they didn’t touch them. They were the owners of those wires, but there was a fear of removing someone else’s hard work, and of destroying value. I’m sure each previous owner had a vague hope of completion. After all, a home audio system is a grand idea. Who doesn’t want speakers in most rooms? That sounds awesome.

In both my current and previous house, I removed as much wiring as possible. I’m trying to simplify my home while at the same time increasing its intelligence. Sometime after 1928, my old house in St. Paul was retrofitted to have telephone wiring. I ripped out as much of it as I could because it was unnecessary and just one more thing in the way. In my current house I cut the telephone wires as they entered my house in the basement—the conduit that penetrated the foundation leaked water and the wires then entered a giant, unnecessary metal box hung on the wall. Garbage and moisture I don’t need. And never will need. No one who ever owns this house will ever need to plug a phone into a wall, I’m sure of that. Likewise, I’ve removed TV cables. We have one location for our modem and that’s it. Why would anyone connect a TV to a wire? It’s all over the air. Oh and the speaker system. The speakers are still in the ceiling for now. It’s cheaper to leave them in than patch all my ceilings. But I’ve cut back the speaker cables as far as I can. When it’s my turn to remodel the house, I’ll rip even more stuff out.

How many satellite dishes does your house have? Mine has three. Your response to that is correct. Big whoop. No one cares. And that’s right. I don’t care either. Unless there’s some resale value.

At some point between 1999 and 2014 it all became clutter and waste. Those systems turned from excessive, high-end features into bad technology. They became outdated and weren’t future proof. To be fair, when the wiring was installed, the idea of a wireless future was barely visible. Now we know better. Now everything needs to be plug and play, open source, and swappable. And we also understand that the technological change from 1999 to 2014 will be dwarfed by the change from 2015 to 2030.

I think about the architects from the first parts of the 20th century and the end of the 19th. Their buildings were so simple. There was no need to design them using advanced BIM software and processes. A Frank Lloyd Wright house had electricity, water, and gas, but not much else. The systems were simple. Things then increased in complexity for about a century. But I think we’re returning to a place of simplicity. Not an archaic simplicity, but a technologically supported one. We need less wires in our walls. We need less permanent things in our buildings. We know enough about building science to design tighter homes that require less mechanical systems.

The R value of this image makes me cryEvery time I see the above image, I cringe. Those might be perfectly aligned conduits filled with who knows what wires, but I really wish that was insulation instead. The smart home I want to create for myself, and design for others, is about software, not hardware. Where we have to add hardware, it needs to be about taping into an existing wireless ecosystem. It needs to be as light as possible and rely on the increasing intelligence of its surroundings. It also needs to be accessible and replaceable. More like a microwave sitting on a counter than a washing machine sitting in a perfectly sized space below the counter (both things I’ve had to replace in this house). If it has wires running deep into the walls, then it’s probably not what you want. The conscious home of the future should be filled with intelligence, not crap that gets in the way of it also functioning like a great unconscious home.

Subscribe to my blog to read more about the tricky world of being an Architect in the 21st century: Shoegnome on FacebookTwitter, and the RSS feed. For a while in high school I wanted to study robots. Unfortunately it was a time before that was a legitimate thing to want to do and it was definitely before high schools had robotics teams. But I think in a few years houses, robots, and AI will have so much overlap that I might accomplish that dream after all.

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Going from Feet to Meters and Switching ArchiCAD Libraries http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/05/going-from-feet-to-meters-and-switching-archicad-libraries/ http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/05/going-from-feet-to-meters-and-switching-archicad-libraries/#comments Tue, 05 May 2015 19:41:32 +0000 http://www.shoegnome.com/?p=2646 I regularly get asked if there is a metric version of the Shoegnome Open Template—or if I have any plans to make one. I won't be making one, but you can do it. Here's how.

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I regularly get asked if there is a metric version of the Shoegnome Open Template—or if I have any plans to make one. I don’t see myself creating or maintaining more than one version of my template, and that version is probably always going to be imperial units and the ARCHICAD USA library. My template is primarily for my own work, and that of the few other architects I work very closely with. We all do custom residential in the United States. It’s the same reason a version of my template geared towards commercial work is not coming anytime soon. I don’t expect to be doing that kind of work with any regularity, not anytime soon—though I might be loosely connected to a bakery project in Houston and a restaurant here in Seattle. But both those projects are of a similar scale to some of the homes I work on, so there’s little change needed. Millimeters and ObjectsIf I have a few hours in a month to dedicate to my ARCHICAD template, I want to make it better—that means adding and refining features, beginning the update to ARCHICAD 19, and general research. Maintaining another version of the template would slow me down and be a distraction. How could I choose which localization to update it to? Of the 27 localizations that GRAPHISOFT releases, four are English language versions. More importantly, I don’t know enough about metric conventions or other standard practices of different regions. I am not an expert in those areas. My changes would be guesses. You’d want to review everything I did before using my updates. Millimeters and missing objectsFortunately converting my template to metric and to your preferred Library isn’t complicated. It just takes a little bit of time. Watch the video below, fire up ARCHICAD tonight, pour yourself a beverage, put on a good podcast, and update the Shoegnome Open Template. It’ll go way faster than you think. As you’ll see, changing units is easy. Using the Shoegnome Open Template in metric, but with the USA Library is super easy and quick to make happen. Switching ARCHICAD Libraries is a bit more effort. But no harder than updating a template from one version of ARCHICAD to another (say 18 to 19).

Now that you’ve watched the video, here are some useful links:

As I mention in the video, this is a big topic and I expect questions. Ask away!

If you want all the latest Shoegnome Open Template news, sign up for the mailing list below. I’ll only send e-mails about the template:

Sign up for the mailing list!

Thank you to everyone who has supported the template. I really appreciate the help and encouragement. Of course if you DO update my template, I’d love to see what you do and share it with everyone else. Subscribe to my blog to read more about the tricky world of being an Architect in the 21st century. Shoegnome on Facebook, Twitter, and the RSS feed.

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ARCHICAD 19 – Faster than Ever http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/05/archicad-19-faster-than-ever/ http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/05/archicad-19-faster-than-ever/#comments Tue, 05 May 2015 15:42:16 +0000 http://www.shoegnome.com/?p=2643 ArchiCAD 19 has been announced! Good luck being productive today. There's a lot to read about and a lot of videos to watch on YouTube.

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After you read the press release, check out all the new feature videos on the ARCHICAD YouTube Channel.

AC19_BOX_R2

BUDAPEST, May 5, 2015 – GRAPHISOFT® announced today the latest version of its industry-leading BIM software solution for architects and designers. ARCHICAD 19 takes the next quantum leap in BIM performance by extending its robust 64-bit and multi-processing technologies with predictive background processing, an industry-first to BIM. As a result, ARCHICAD now offers lightning-fast response times, making it the undisputed speed leader in the BIM business.

“End-users perceive software performance as one single measurement – however it is the combination of a large number of factors,” said Péter Temesvári, Director, Product Management at GRAPHISOFT. “ARCHICAD 19 introduces major improvements — most importantly to its intuitiveness and responsiveness — offering a unique, fluid feel to interactions with the software. Its patent pending predictive background processing capability reinforces ARCHICAD’s technology leadership position in the BIM field.”

About ARCHICAD 19

Improved Work Environment – The new Tab Bar for multiple viewpoints allows speedier switching among Floor Plans, Sections, Elevations, and 3D windows.

Permanent Guidelines – Brand new Guide Lines, Snap Guides and Snap Points provide permanent graphical support for accurate element creation and editing.

Interactive 3D Surface Painter – Intuitive, ‘drag-and-drop’ building model surface editing in 3D provides instant, visual feedback. ARCHICAD 19’s new Surface Painter enables designers to change model surfaces in the 3D window with a single click using a floating palette called Surface Editor.

Smoother, faster 3D navigation with OpenGL – ARCHICAD 19 uses a fully-optimized OpenGL engine ensuring smoother, faster 3D navigation, even when working with extremely large building models.

Predictive Background Processing – ARCHICAD 19 takes advantage of unused computer capacity by anticipating potential future user actions and preparing for them in the background. This greatly increases the overall responsiveness of the application, so it feels more agile with projects of any type or size. The dramatic difference between GRAPHISOFT’s next-gen technology and standard BIM software can be best witnessed when returning to one’s previous BIM software without background processing.

Leading the Way in OPEN BIM – ARCHICAD 19 allows users to import the IFC model exactly as it looked in the original application in which it was created. Collision detection now works with all imported IFC MEP elements as well. Improved collision detection performance makes ARCHICAD 19 a unique BIM authoring tool with full-fledged interdisciplinary coordination capabilities.

Further productivity improvements – ARCHICAD 19 makes many time-consuming tasks easier than ever:

  • Point-Cloud Support: 3D laser scanned surveyor data can be imported into the model to help visualize the environment or the “as built” structure.
  • Listing Enhancements: Listing skin areas in interactive schedules helps users accurately schedule the area of any skins from composite structures.
  • Annotation Improvements: Pointer for Dimension Texts helps dimension narrow structures close to each other by automatically adding pointers. Multi-leader automatic labels help ease the tedious work of documentation.
  • PDF improvements: By implementing a truly WYSIWYG – “what you see is what you get” – solution, ARCHICAD 19 ensures that only the visible layers will be included in the created PDF.

GRAPHISOFT ARCHICAD® 19 will start shipping in June, 2015, with an impressive list of 26 local versions rolled out by the end of Q3 2015. Learn more about the upcoming release here: http://www.graphisoft.com/archicad/archicad-19/overview/.

About GRAPHISOFT

GRAPHISOFT® ignited the BIM revolution in 1984 with ARCHICAD®, the industry first BIM software for architects. GRAPHISOFT continues to lead the industry with innovative solutions such as its revolutionary BIMcloud® the world’s first real-time BIM collaboration environment, EcoDesigner™, the world’s first fully BIM-integrated “GREEN” design solution and BIMx®, the world’s leading mobile app for BIM visualization. GRAPHISOFT has been a part of the Nemetschek Group since its acquisition in 2007.

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Trimble and Nemetschek Group form Strategic Alliance http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/04/trimble-and-nemetschek-group-form-strategic-alliance/ http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/05/04/trimble-and-nemetschek-group-form-strategic-alliance/#comments Mon, 04 May 2015 21:50:27 +0000 http://www.shoegnome.com/?p=2640 Trimble and Nemetschek plan to leverage the Trimble® Connect collaboration platform to integrate workflows between various BIM software. This is fantastic. More BIM. More Open. More Choice.

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Trimble and Nemetschek Group Partner to Expand Adoption of Building Information Modeling Across Building Design, Construction and Operation

Nemetschek and Trimble

Companies Collaborate to Promote Openness and Interoperability Across their Solution Portfolios

BUDAPEST, May 4, 2015GRAPHISOFT®, the leading Building Information Modeling (BIM) architectural software developer, has announced that its parent company Nemetschek Group (XETRA: NEM) and Trimble (NASDAQ: TRMB), leaders in digital solutions for the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) markets, announced today that they have formed a strategic alliance to expand the deployment of Building Information Modeling (BIM) across the entire Design-Build-Operate (DBO) lifecycle of buildings. The alliance will emphasize collaborative approaches to design modeling and 5D construction management through data integration between a variety of the companies’ products.

The announcement was made today at the Lake Constance 5D-Conference 2015 held this week in Constance, Germany.

Trimble and Nemetschek will share their extensive global market and technology expertise and collaborate on initiatives to drive a paradigm change in the development and adoption of technologies for the AEC industry and building owners.

The companies intend to:

  • Transparently share data formats to support new solutions and promote workflow interoperability between selected products across the DBO lifecycle;
  • Tighten the connection of Virtual Design & Construction (VDC) solutions to real data from the field and real objects in the physical world;
  • Support interoperability and the longevity of project data for the entire project lifecycle;
  • Maintain their respective deep commitments to open standards and workflows for the benefit of the entire industry—rather than for any individual vendor.

Open, Connected and Interoperable via Trimble Connect

Trimble and Nemetschek plan to leverage the Trimble® Connect collaboration platform to integrate workflows and create close interoperability between selected Trimble solutions—including SketchUp, Tekla Structures, Vico Office, Trimble Prolog®, Trimble Field Link and MEPdesigner for SketchUp—and solutions in the Nemetschek portfolio, such as Allplan, ArchiCAD, DDS, SCIA Engineering, Vectorworks and Nevaris.

Both companies are committed to open standards and workflows—a rapidly emerging approach to the collaborative design, construction and operation of buildings. With Nemetschek solutions supporting the Trimble Connect platform—a cloud-based collaboration environment that features an open environment for BIM-based AEC workflows—Trimble and Nemetschek are coordinating their efforts to offer best-of-breed solutions for customers.

“Across the DBO spectrum, customers want the freedom to choose the best tools for the job and the security of knowing those tools will work together. But too often they find that the data they need is not interoperable across their different software workflows,” said Bryn Fosburgh, vice president responsible for Trimble’s Construction Technology Divisions. “Our companies’ shared vision is to give users a choice, rather than dictate what they use. We’re pleased to partner with Nemetschek on these important initiatives.”

“Our customers already enjoy the benefits of workflow integration between most of our products. This collaboration allows us to provide an overarching strategic layer on top of everything we do,” said Patrik Heider, spokesman and Chief Financial & Operations Officer (CFOO) of the Nemetschek Group. “This will better enable us to provide our customers with end-to-end workflow solutions that cover the entire AEC life cycle in a fully transparent and ‘open’ way.”

Trimble and Nemetschek will provide updates on specific collaborative initiatives as the relationship progresses.

About GRAPHISOFT

GRAPHISOFT® ignited the BIM revolution in 1984 with ArchiCAD®, the industry-first BIM software for architects. GRAPHISOFT continues to lead the industry with innovative solutions such as its revolutionary BIMcloud®, the world’s first real-time BIM collaboration environment, EcoDesigner™, the world’s first fully BIM-integrated “GREEN” design solution and BIMx®, the world’s leading mobile app for BIM visualization. GRAPHISOFT has been a part of the Nemetschek Group since its acquisition in 2007. Visit archicad.com to see the most important milestones in ArchiCAD’s 30-year history.

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GRAPHISOFT Announces Rhinoceros – ArchiCAD Connection http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/04/30/graphisoft-announces-rhinoceros-archicad-connection/ http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/04/30/graphisoft-announces-rhinoceros-archicad-connection/#comments Thu, 30 Apr 2015 17:05:25 +0000 http://www.shoegnome.com/?p=2636 Now you can go directly from Rhinoceros to ArchiCAD.

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BUDAPEST, April 30, 2015 GRAPHISOFT®, the leading Building Information Modeling (BIM) architectural software developer, has announced a Rhino® connection for ArchiCAD. The connection enables ArchiCAD users on both the Mac and Windows platforms to import Rhino models into ArchiCAD as GDL objects.

graphisoft-announces-rhinoceros-archicad-connectionGuggenheim Helsinki Design Competition Entry by Nikken Sekkei

The Rhino-ArchiCAD link converts a Rhino model into ArchiCAD geometry. The container of the Rhino-based model is GDL, which is ArchiCAD’s generic object format. For larger and complex models, GRAPHISOFT has introduced the option to convert a Rhino model into a set of (smaller) GDL objects. This process enables the user to retain separate logical parts within the same model while providing a functionality to monitor and easily update the imported Rhino models in ArchiCAD. The LCF option is also advised to enable ArchiCAD’s performance optimization algorithm to work seamlessly on an imported large Rhino model.

“We welcome Rhinoceros into the ArchiCAD community,” said László Vértesi, GRAPHISOFT Vice President of Product Development. “Rhino provides a robust modeling capability that nicely compliments the ArchiCAD BIM solution.”

“Our users always want better integration with the other tools that they use,” said Robert McNeel, CEO, Robert McNeel & Associates. “We are delighted to be working with GRAPHISOFT to meet our users’ demands,” he added.

This technology has been developed as part of an ongoing collaboration between GRAPHISOFT and Nikken Sekkei that aims to develop future technologies for architectural design.

For more information and to download the Rhino add-on for ArchiCAD, please visit http://www.graphisoft.com/downloads/addons/interoperability/rhino.html.

About Rhino

Rhinoceros® 5.0, developed by Robert McNeel & Associates, is the market leader in industrial design modeling software. Highly complicated shapes can be directly modeled or acquired through 3D digitizers. With its powerful NURBS based engine Rhinoceros® 5.0 can create, edit, analyze, and translate curves, surfaces, and solids. There are no limits on complexity, degree, or size.

About Nikken Sekkei

One of the world’s largest architectural design firms with over 2,400 professional staff, Nikken Sekkei and its eight Group companies offer comprehensive design, engineering, management, consulting and R&D services. Established in 1900, the company’s portfolio consists of over 20,000 projects in 40 countries. Its activities cover a wide spectrum of sustainable public and private endeavors including: new city design, high-density/mixed-use transit-oriented developments, super high-rise buildings, business parks, offices and facilities for commercial, cultural, educational and healthcare use. Nikken Sekkei is headquartered in Tokyo and maintains branch offices in Singapore, China, Korea, Vietnam and the UAE. In growing to its present position, the company has constantly focused on development of new methods and technologies that redefine design for current needs and priorities.

About GRAPHISOFT

GRAPHISOFT® ignited the BIM revolution in 1984 with ArchiCAD®, the industry-first BIM software for architects. GRAPHISOFT continues to lead the industry with innovative solutions such as its revolutionary BIMcloud®, the world’s first real-time BIM collaboration environment, EcoDesigner™, the world’s first fully BIM-integrated “GREEN” design solution and BIMx®, the world’s leading mobile app for BIM visualization. GRAPHISOFT has been a part of the Nemetschek Group since its acquisition in 2007. Visit archicad.com to see the most important milestones in ArchiCAD’s 30-year history.

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Trimble Partners with Microsoft to Bring Microsoft HoloLens Wearable Holographic Technology to the AEC Industry http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/04/29/trimble-partners-with-microsoft-to-bring-microsoft-hololens-wearable-holographic-technology-to-the-aec-industry/ http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/04/29/trimble-partners-with-microsoft-to-bring-microsoft-hololens-wearable-holographic-technology-to-the-aec-industry/#comments Thu, 30 Apr 2015 04:09:23 +0000 http://www.shoegnome.com/?p=2634 Trimble is working with Microsoft to develop a new generation of tools, integrated with the HoloLens holographic platform on Windows 10. Make sure to watch the (marketing) videos. This is the world that is upon us.

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Trimble to Integrate Microsoft HoloLens with Selected Trimble Solutions for Mixed-Reality Design, Construction and Operation Processes

SAN FRANCISCO, April 29, 2015—Trimble (NASDAQ:TRMB) announced today that it is working with Microsoft to develop a new generation of tools, integrated with the HoloLens holographic platform on Windows 10, which are intended to improve quality, collaboration and efficiency in the design, construction and operation of buildings and structures. A proof of concept was demonstrated at Microsoft’s Build Developer Conference held this week in San Francisco.

Microsoft HoloLens is a head-mounted, holographic computer that provides a mixed-reality experience for a range of commercial and consumer applications. When used by architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) professionals, the HoloLens device extends interaction with 3D models beyond the confines of a 2D computer screen, creating new ways for the many stakeholders of complex, multi-phase construction projects to visualize, collaborate, share ideas and manage change.

Demonstration Highlights Design and Collaboration Scenarios

During the Build Conference keynote session, Microsoft demonstrated how the integration of HoloLens with Trimble’s SketchUp 3D modeling software and the Trimble Connect collaboration platform could improve design and construction processes. Using HoloLens, architects were able to experience their SketchUp models as holograms placed in the real world—enabling them to quickly analyze various “what if” design scenarios in the context of the physical environment. The demonstration also illustrated how using Trimble Connect with HoloLens holographic technology enables remote teams to effectively review and collaborate in order to resolve constructability issues in real time.

A recording of the demonstration is available at:  www.buildwindows.com. Additional information on the Trimble and Microsoft collaboration is available at: http://buildings.trimble.com/hololens.

“Trimble has a mission to deliver solutions that transform the user experience and work processes in many industries,” said Bryn Fosburgh, vice president responsible for Trimble’s Construction Technology Divisions. “We believe that HoloLens is a game-changer for design and construction teams by facilitating improved communication, and enhanced transparency. We’re excited to partner with Microsoft in creating what could be a new era for technology in the AEC market.”

“Microsoft HoloLens is a revolutionary tool for people and businesses enabling professionals in industries like design and construction to do more and achieve more,” said Yusuf Mehdi, corporate vice president, devices & studios, at Microsoft. “Trimble’s deep knowledge of design and construction processes makes it a natural partner in bringing holographic computing to this industry.”

Initial Development Focus

Trimble’s initial research is focused on the integration of HoloLens with three Trimble solutions:

  • Trimble® Connect – a collaboration environment for design, engineering and construction projects, based on Gehry Technologies’ GTeam™ software acquired by Trimble in in 2014, Trimble Connect enables teams to access and manage project data via a cloud platform.
  • SketchUp – the world’s most popular 3D modeling platform, used by millions around the world to create, update and communicate designs in 3D.
  • Trimble V10 Imaging Rover – an integrated camera system that precisely captures 360-degree digital panoramas for efficient visual documentation and measurement of the surrounding environment that can be transformed into data-rich geospatial deliverables.

Trimble’s HoloLens-enabled solutions are currently under development. Details on availability were not disclosed at the Build Conference. Information on Trimble’s broad range of existing solutions for the design, construction and operation of building and infrastructure is available at:  http://www.trimble.com/Industries/Construction/index.aspx.

About Trimble 
Trimble applies technology to make field and mobile workers in businesses and government significantly more productive. Solutions are focused on applications requiring position or location—including surveying, construction, agriculture, fleet and asset management, public safety and mapping. In addition to utilizing positioning technologies, such as GPS, lasers and optics, Trimble solutions may include software content specific to the needs of the user. Wireless technologies are utilized to deliver the solution to the user and to ensure a tight coupling of the field and the back office. Founded in 1978, Trimble is headquartered in Sunnyvale, Calif.

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BCF Manager for Navisworks via BIMcollab http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/04/23/bcf-manager-for-navisworks-via-bimcollab/ http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/04/23/bcf-manager-for-navisworks-via-bimcollab/#comments Thu, 23 Apr 2015 23:23:15 +0000 http://www.shoegnome.com/?p=2632 Kubus increases the value of BIMcollab with a BCF Manager for Navisworks.

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BIMcollab NetworkNew: BIMcollab® BCF Manager for Navisworks

Share clashes found in Navisworks via BIMcollab to Revit or ArchiCAD

Eindhoven, Netherlands April 23 2015 – Today KUBUS released BIMcollab® BCF Manager for Navisworks. This add-on provides full support for both BCF 1.0 and BCF 2.0 to Navisworks. Additionally, it has a direct connection to BIMcollab® for issue management across teams and other BIM tools. Issues found in Navisworks can be visualized in BIM tools like Revit and ArchiCAD, since the relevant objects and camera-position are saved as well.

  • Issues can be generated directly from Navisworks and previewed before saving and publishing.
  • Comments can be added, properties and milestones set, and found issues can be assigned team members.
  • A simple double-click is enough to zoom to the issue.
  • All results can be visualized in a presentation for clear communication.

BIMcollab® is a cloud-based issue management system for BIM, based on BuildingSMART’s BCF file format. BCF is designed to support communication between team members about BIM models without the need of sending the complete model. A snapshot of the issue clearly explains the problem, to both BIM users and non-BIM users like contractors, who can use the browser-based version.

CEO of KUBUS, Erik Pijnenburg: “With this tool we extend Navisworks’ power to find clashes or other issues with OPEN BIM communication to all major BIM authoring tools.”

The release of this add-on expands the number of BIM applications linked to BIMcollab® even further, bridging the communication gap between more and more BIM applications.

For more information visit www.bimcollab.com

About KUBUS

KUBUS offers BIM for Design & Build and is exclusive distributor for Graphisoft and Gold partner of Solibri, Inc. in the Benelux. KUBUS promotes OpenBIM and IFC workflow solutions and is the developer of the most widely used software for Building Specifications for Dutch standards, cost-calculations and eco-cost material analysis based on BIM. KUBUS developed BIMcollab®, the world’s first cloud based issue management system for BIM. KUBUS is committed to make this the best issue management solution for BIM. BIMcollab® was released in December 2014. From offices in Eindhoven, Amsterdam, and Belgrade, KUBUS services currently over 3,250 customers within the construction industry of the Benelux.

For more information
Contact Lotje van Rijsoort or Rosa van Tour – marketing@kubusinfo.nl – T. +31(0)40 213 1950
www.bimcollab.com
www.kubusinfo.nl
twitter.com/KUBUSBV

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ArchiCAD Spring Academy 2015 http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/04/23/archicad-spring-academy-2015/ http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/04/23/archicad-spring-academy-2015/#comments Thu, 23 Apr 2015 22:46:17 +0000 http://www.shoegnome.com/?p=2625 It’s approaching that magical time of year again, when the collective ArchiCAD brainpower of one location becomes almost incomprehensible. That’s right, the ArchiCAD Spring Academy is only a few weeks away (May 22nd and 23rd)! In 2015 it’s taking place in Cracow, Poland. The ArchiCAD Users Association International (ACUA) knows how to pick amazing locations for their events. Here’s the basic info and then a link for more info/registration: “ArchiCAD Spring Academy 2015 is a two day celebration that will educate, entertain, and immerse you in the ArchiCAD community. You will be offered access to ArchiCAD BIM related products and

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It’s approaching that magical time of year again, when the collective ArchiCAD brainpower of one location becomes almost incomprehensible. That’s right, the ArchiCAD Spring Academy is only a few weeks away (May 22nd and 23rd)! In 2015 it’s taking place in Cracow, Poland. The ArchiCAD Users Association International (ACUA) knows how to pick amazing locations for their events. Here’s the basic info and then a link for more info/registration:

strona_ArchiCADSA2015“ArchiCAD Spring Academy 2015 is a two day celebration that will educate, entertain, and immerse you in the ArchiCAD community. You will be offered access to ArchiCAD BIM related products and services, paired with expert advice, demonstrations, workshops and instructions. Conference programs feature world famous architects and industry leading minds, presenting cutting edge product training on the topics you most want to see. Whether you are a creative professional or a CAD-BIM manager, ArchiCAD Spring Academy has the conference content, special presentations, exhibit hall highlights and experiences that meet all of your specific needs. The exciting and highly informative agenda is focused on innovative use of design tools, technologies, and methodologies that allow and encourage new forms of architectural expression.”

That Sounds Awesome. I want to know more and probably sign up!

So we’ll see you there, right Jared?

ArchiCON_smallEvery year I say I want to go. And every year I have some reason for not attending. For the past too many years it has usually been “I’m moving.” Fortunately I’m done with that excuse. Alas I won’t be there this year. BUT BUT BUT. For once I have a legitimate ArchiCAD-related excuse for not being able to attend an ACUA event: I’ll be in Brisbane, Australia that weekend for ArchiCON. While I won’t be in Poland, I’ll be elsewhere sharing ArchiCAD and BIM knowledge, and doing my part to advance us all.

 

What are you doing that weekend? You’ve got two amazing choices for improving your ArchiCAD and BIM skills.

But seriously, I can’t go to Australia or Poland next month!

I understand. Have you thought about starting an ArchiCAD conference in your area—or even just a user group? Let’s talk and I’ll see who I can connect you with to help get that going. Or maybe a virtual event is more your style? We could chat about that too. I don’t have the time right now to lead either of those charges, but I’d love to connect and support other users who want to make all that happen. Just imagine…a panoply of ArchiCAD events, all over the world, throughout the year—both physical and virtual.

Subscribe to my blog to read more about the tricky world of being an Architect in the 21st century—and to hear about other ArchiCAD user events around the globe. Shoegnome on Facebook, Twitter, and the RSS feed.

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Seattle ArchiCAD User Group – April 30th, 2015 http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/04/12/seattle-archicad-user-group-april-2015/ http://www.shoegnome.com/2015/04/12/seattle-archicad-user-group-april-2015/#comments Mon, 13 Apr 2015 03:50:17 +0000 http://www.shoegnome.com/?p=2617 It's time for another Seattle ArchiCAD User Group. We're going to talk about add-ons, 3rd party Objects, and other things that don't come with the default installation of ArchiCAD. Read on for all the details. Come join us!

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ArchiCAD User Group - 18We have our next Seattle ArchiCAD User Group scheduled. Please notice that we are now meeting in a non-downtown location at a slightly later time (like we did in February). Everyone liked February’s location and time so much that I think this will become our new normal. Here are the details:

Date:

Thursday April 30, 2015
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Location:

DeForest Architects
1148 NW Leary Way
Seattle, WA 98107

Host:

Jesse Gallanar, GSNA’s sales manager for Washington, Oregon, and Alaska

Special Thanks:

Geoff Briggs, John DeForest and the whole team at DeForest Architects for letting us congregate in their new space.

What’s Happening:

When you register, you’ll see the official topics of discussion. After the last user group in February, there was a consensus that a great topic would be BIMx Pro, add-ons, 3rd party Objects, and all the things that don’t come out of the box when you buy ArchiCAD—not that anyone actually gets a box anymore. So that’s what we’re going to discuss. If you use a particular add-on or Object, think about bringing your laptop to share. We’ll have Geoff’s machine and mine, but that definitely won’t cover the full gambit of add-ons. I’m going to use the meeting as the final excuse I need to buy Modelport. That also means I hope to have some renderings to share that contain Objects I created via Modelport.

Of course as anyone who’s ever been to a user group that I’ve run knows, lengthy lectures aren’t the goal. The official topics are just a starting point. What I want to see—and what I hope the topics will facilitate—is a two hour discussion about ArchiCAD that continues afterwards at a local bar**. So if you don’t care about 3rd party stuff, don’t worry. Show up and change the subject. Sound good? Bring whatever you need: questions, a project, a printout, a gripe, a coworker, a friend, a disgruntled Revit user, a prospective user. I don’t care. I just want to get a big bunch of passionate ArchiCAD and BIM users together to talk about what’s important. You in? ALSO…if you have a question or topic you’d like to have discussed, please e-mail me ahead of time. I can’t promise we’ll cover it (especially if you ask about EcoDesigner STAR), but we’ll do our best.

Please share this post and e-mail it to all your coworkers. I know not everyone gets the official e-mails about user groups—especially new and/or quieter employees.

**100% yes we will be having an after-party ArchiCAD nerdfest at a nearby bar. Geoff tells me there are a lot of great places to go close to their new office. And I assume, as with the previous meetings, Jesse will be feeding us.

Seattle Area ArchiCAD User Mailing List

I’m creating a mailing list for ArchiCAD users in the Seattle Area (or people interested in Seattle Area ArchiCAD events). If that describes you, sign up by clicking here.

A Big Link to Register for the User Group

In case you missed the link above, here it is again: REGISTER HERE!

Subscribe to my blog to read more about the tricky world of being an Architect in the 21st century, and more info on various ArchiCAD meet-ups across the globe: Shoegnome on FacebookTwitter, and the RSS feed.

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